2020 Ain’t All Bad

Miles and I traveled to City of Hope last week for my annual cancer scans, filled with the usual scanxiety. This was amplified by the fact that Miles would not – for the first time in 8+ years – be able to join me inside due to COVID-19 protocols. He has not only attended every single appointment, but he comes into the actual MRI room, and sits in my direct line of sight at the bottom of the MRI tube, in case I get scared and need a reassuring look from him. He’s the one who drops me off at one door for my CT scan, and races down the hallway to what he’s figured out is the exit door, just to make sure he’s there when I’m done with the scan. He carries my bag, rubs my back, and nervously holds my hand. So yeah, the fact he wasn’t even allowed in the building was weird for us.

I carried these with me on scan day – Hope made me the heart, & Maggie bestowed on me this precious feather…which she picked from a couch cushion 😉

However, in respect and gratitude for these new COVID-19 protocols, I donned my mask, got my temperature check and wristband indicating I was cleared, and entered the building. Miles drove to an onsite parking lot to anxiously await my update texts and calls, chewing his nails, his legs jumping anxiously (I didn’t have to actually see this to know it was going on). I had my usual blood draw, popped over for a chest CT scan, then headed for my brain MRI. Except for the 3 extremely painful pic line attempts by the phlebotomist who couldn’t seem to find a vein (something I was actually grateful Miles wasn’t there for, as he’d have passed out by attempt number two), all went normally and surprisingly quickly.

I missed my main cheerleader, though, and when he swung the car around to pick me up, I collapsed across the center console into his arms. Being a patient can be a lonely job, and it’s times like this I remember how lucky I am to have his reassurances, his hand on my back, his reminders of why I’m fighting, and his love when blood draws go bad and I desperately need a hug.

Miles’ Scan Day wardrobe since 2012: Same “lucky” plaid shirt and ripped jeans, no matter the temps (usually in the 90s!).

This year was made further complicated by the fact that my amazing oncologist, Dr. Karen Reckamp, switched facilities. I am so happy for her at this awesome new position. But, Miles and I did have to admit that it put a bit of a wrench in our normal routine. We agonized for a few weeks over what to do: stay entirely at City of Hope for old times sake? Switch institutions with her? We opted for what we believe to be the best-case scenario: staying with City of Hope for testing and scans (the superstitions in us just couldn’t imagine doing these elsewhere), and keeping Dr. Reckamp as my oncologist (the thought of anyone else was unacceptable).

We felt good once the decision was made, but as my scan drew closer, new anxieties crept in: Would it be more difficult, now that my scans and doctor were in different places? Were we bucking an already-proven method, and would that somehow lead to some sort of issue? (superstition is a bitch – especially in the cancer world). And, most importantly, would we still be able to get same-day results? I’m not sure I can fully describe to you the amount of stress and anxiety involved in waiting for scan results. Waiting for the scans and tests themselves is bad enough, but the minute those are done begins the waiting and the worrying about what the tests will actually say. What they will mean for your future, your life, your family. All of it. Dr. Reckamp, her amazing PAs, and City of Hope have always gone above-and-beyond to make this wait as short as possible for us, saving us mountains of stress, and probably a few bottles of Xanax. We had no idea what to expect this year.

Our beach babies (ML/HR)

So, we waited. I texted Dr. Reckamp that morning to let her know Miles was wearing his trusty “Scan Day” outfit, something she gets a good chuckle from. And then Miles and I sat in bed, watching episode after episode of The Wire, mindlessly eating junk food, and blessedly distracted by photos and videos of our girls, who got to have a “vacation” at Grandma and Pop’s house while we just WAITED. Around 4:30 pm I (hopefully un-annoyingly) texted Dr. Reckamp a hail-mary, “Just wondering if you might have heard anything on the scans?”

Her response: “Brain and CT look clear. Sleep well tonight!”

My main cheerleader and I screamed and ran around the house, hugged and cried, and let the feeling of another cancer-free year wash over us. The waiting never gets easier. But the relief and hope…that gets better with each passing year.

Cheers to 7.5 years NED (No Evidence of Disease). Thank you all for your love and support.

Much love. Live in the moment.

EmBen